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Undergraduate Catalog 2014-2015


General Education Program and Requirements

General Education Program and Requirements
Office of the Associate Provost and Dean for Undergraduate Studies
2100 Marie Mount Hall, 301-405-9363
Contact:  Douglas Roberts, Associate Dean for General Education
www.gened.umd.edu
gened@umd.edu

New freshmen for fall 2012 and after will follow the General Education@UMD Program:   www.gened.umd.edu .  Students enrolled at the university prior to fall 2012 will be under the CORE Program: www.ugst.umd.edu/core .  Transfer and other students should check the General Education Program: Effective Dates information below.

General Education Program: Effective Dates

Students matriculating* to the University of Maryland (including freshmen and students transferring from private institutions and from non-Maryland public institutions) beginning in fall 2012 will be subject to the University’s General Education Program requirements www.gened.umd.edu , except as provided below:

1.  The University of Maryland, College Park requires students to complete a minimum of 40 credits of general education.  Students transferring to the University who have completed their general education requirements at another Maryland public institution of higher education will be considered to have completed their general education requirements with the exception of an upper-level writing course and any additional credits necessary to complete the minimum number of general education credits.

2.  Students transferring to the University from another Maryland public institution of higher education who have not completed their general education requirements at another Maryland public institution of higher education will be treated as follows:

   a. Students who matriculate to college beginning in fall 2012 and thereafter will be subject to the new General Education Program requirements upon transfer to the University of Maryland.

   b. Students who matriculate to college prior to fall 2012 but transfer to the University of Maryland prior to fall 2016 will be subject to the CORE general education requirements ( www.ugst.umd.edu/core ).

   c. Students who transfer to the University of Maryland beginning in fall 2016 and thereafter will be subject to the General Education Program requirements, regardless of the date of their matriculation at another Maryland public institution of higher education following award of the high school diploma.

3. Students returning or transferring to College Park after a separation from college of five or more continuous years must follow the requirements in effect at the time of reentry.  Students who matriculate to the University with a bachelor’s degree from any regionally accredited college or university will be considered to have satisfied the University’s general education requirements, regardless of when the degree was received.

*For purposes of this transfer policy, matriculation means to be admitted to college and enrolled in classes following award of the high school diploma.

General Education at the University of Maryland

Through the General Education program you will discover that education at the University of Maryland is an experience that reaches from the campus classroom and lab to across the globe.  As a student you will engage with that larger universe by acquiring new skills and understandings.  General Education exposes you to different disciplines, improves your fundamental academic skills, and strengthens your commitment to using knowledge and abilities to better yourself and others.

The General Education program will assist you in preparing for a new "multiverse" of learning, and for the demanding and constantly changing world beyond graduation.  It provides necessary skills and basic knowledge, complements and expands the university's course offerings, and connects you more fully to the intellectual community of the Washington-Baltimore metropolitan area, the nation, and the world beyond.

General Education program goals for all students:

  • Develop the skills necessary to succeed in academic careers and in professional lives by establishing habits and understanding of clear writing, effective speaking and presentation, and critical and analytic reasoning.
  • Strengthen knowledge in major areas of study.
  • Broaden knowledge of civilizations past and present.
  • Establish the ability to thrive both intellectually and materially and to support themselves, their families, and their communities through a broad understanding of the world in which they live and work.
  • Define the ethical imperatives necessary to create a just society in their own communities and in the larger world.

IMPORTANT NOTES:  General Education courses:

  • MUST be selected from the courses coded as meeting General Education requirements. See list of approved General Education courses at Testudo: https://ntst.umd.edu/soc/ .  Click on the General Education list for the term you wish to explore.
  • MAY also be used to satisfy college, major, and/or supporting area requirements
  • MAY NOT be taken on a Pass-Fail basis.

Elements of the GENERAL EDUCATION@UMD PROGRAM

Fundamental Studies

Master the skills. (5 courses, 15 credits)

  • Mathematics
  • Analytic Reasoning
  • Academic Writing
  • Professional Writing
  • Oral Communication

Mathematics:  The goal of the Mathematics requirement is to convey the power of mathematics, demonstrated by the variety of problems that can be modeled and solved by quantitative means.  Ability in mathematics is a critical measure of how well students are prepared to meet the challenges they will face in their lives beyond school.  Must be attempted by 30 credits and successfully completed by 60 credits.*

Analytic Reasoning:  Courses in Analytic Reasoning foster a student's ability to use mathematical or formal methods or structured protocols and patterns of reasoning to examine problems or issues by evaluating evidence, examining proofs, analyzing relationships between variables, developing arguments, and drawing conclusions appropriately.

If a student passes an Analytical Reasoning course that requires Fundamental Studies Math as a prerequisite, the Math requirement has also been fulfilled.

Academic Writing:  The Fundamental Studies Academic Writing requirement prepares students with a foundational understanding of the writing skills needed for success in further studies at Maryland and beyond.  Must be attempted by 30 credits and successfully completed by 60 credits.*

Professional Writing:  The Fundamental Studies Professional Writing requirement strengthens writing skills and prepares students for the range of writing expected of them after graduation.

Oral Communication: Human relationships, from the most formal to the most personal, rest in large measure on skilled listening and effective speaking.  Skillful listening and speaking support success in personal relationships, educational undertakings, professional advancement, and civic engagement.

* No exemption is allowed for SAT scores. Scores on AP and IB exams may provide exemption. Refer to the 2012-13 Undergraduate Catalog for exemption information:  www.umd.edu/catalog/index.cfm

Distributive Studies

Experience a variety of disciplines. (8 courses, 25 credits)

  • Natural Sciences
  • History and Social Sciences
  • Humanities
  • Scholarship in Practice

The Program has three additional categories that may be taken on their own or, through double-counting, may be rolled up into the Distributive Studies categories. Two of these comprise the Diversity requirement: Understanding Plural Societies and Cultural Competence.  The third is the I-Series program which offers students two courses that deal with major issues.  With double-counting, students will have a minimum of 40 credits in General Education.

Natural Sciences courses introduce the concepts and methods of studying the natural world. Courses include the traditional physical and life sciences, environmental science, animal and avian science, and plant science, among others.  One of the two courses selected must include a substantial, rigorous laboratory experience.

History and Social Science courses introduce students to history and to the social science disciplines, with their combination of qualitative and quantitative methods.  They include courses in criminology, economics, history, psychology, sociology, and other social sciences.

Humanities courses study the history and the genres of human creativity.  They include courses in literatures in any language, art and art history, classics, and music and music history, as well as in the disciplines of linguistics and philosophy, among others.

Scholarship in Practice courses engage students in applying a body of knowledge to create professional products or works of art.  Architecture, business, education, engineering, and journalism offer courses that lead to products such as architectural designs, new technologies, innovative publications, new computer software, business plans, advertising campaigns, educational curricula, and bioengineering.  Creative and artistic performance courses lead students to produce writing portfolios, plays, operas, dance productions, art exhibits, and creative media. Scholarship in Practice also includes courses that combine competency in speaking, writing, and translation in a foreign language.  One of the two Scholarship in Practice courses selected must be outside the student’s major requirements.

To fulfill the Distributive Studies requirement:

  • Students must complete two courses in each of the four Distributive Studies areas for a total of eight courses in Distributive Studies.  One of the courses in the Natural Sciences must include a laboratory experience.
  • Two of the eight courses must be I-Series courses.  I-Series courses double-count with Distributive Studies.  AP credit may not be used to satisfy the I-Series requirement.
  • AP credit for Distributive Studies is limited to six of the eight courses.
  • One of the two Scholarship in Practice courses must be outside the major requirements.
  • Coursework within one's major is permitted to satisfy both the major and general education requirements.
  • A Diversity requirement may be fulfilled by a course that is approved for both a Diversity category and for a Distributive Studies category.

Diversity

Explore human, social, and cultural differences. (2 courses, 4-6 credits that normally double-count with Distributive Studies)

  • Understanding Plural Societies
  • Cultural Competence

To fulfill the Diversity requirement:

  • Students must complete two Understanding Plural Societies courses (6 credits total)
    OR
  • One Understanding Plural Societies course (3 credits) and one Cultural Competence course (1-3 credits).

Courses fulfilling the Diversity requirement may double-count in an approved Distributive Studies category.

Students will not be able to fulfill Understanding Plural Societies and/or Cultural Competence by a study abroad experience unless the study abroad course carries that specific designation.

I-Series
Choose from a unique suite of courses that form the cornerstone of Distributive Studies. (2 courses, 6 credits that double-count with Distributive Studies)
The I-Series is the signature program of General Education at the University of Maryland. I-Series courses are lively and contemporary. They speak to important issues that spark the imagination, demand intellect, and inspire innovation. They challenge students to wrestle with big questions, and examine the ways that different disciplines address them. I-Series courses are not surveys of particular fields of knowledge. Instead, I-Series courses provide students with the basic concepts, approaches, and vocabulary of particular disciplines and fields of study as well as an understanding of how experts in those disciplines and fields employ terms, concepts, and approaches. Visit www.iseries.umd.edu for all the details and course offerings.

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CORE Program Requirements
Office of the Associate Provost and Dean for Undergraduate Studies
2100 Marie Mount Hall, 301-405-9363
Contact: Douglas Roberts, Associate Dean for General Education
www.ugst.umd.edu/core

IMPORTANT: See “General Education Program: Effective Dates” above to determine whether you are under the CORE Program Requirements or the General Education Program Requirements.

CORE Program Elements

1. Fundamental Studies build competence and confidence in basic writing and mathematics.  Mastery of these basics enhances success both during and after college. Students begin fulfilling Fundamental Studies requirements in their first year at the University.   www.ugst.umd.edu/core/elements/FundaSt.html

2. Distributive Studies focus on breadth, including courses in the following categories: Literature; The History or Theory of the Arts; Humanities; Physical Sciences; Life Sciences; Mathematics and Formal Reasoning; Social or Political History; Behavioral and Social Sciences; and Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues. Students generally pursue Distributive Studies in the first two years of their course work.   www.ugst.umd.edu/core/elements/DistrSt.html

3. Advanced Studies allow students to enhance their degree and strengthen their critical thinking and writing skills by taking two upper-level courses outside their major after 60 credits. Students may substitute an approved CORE Capstone course in their major or a senior or honors thesis for one of these two courses.   www.ugst.umd.edu/core/elements/AdvanSt.html

4. Human Cultural Diversity gives students the opportunity to examine their ideas and values in the light of various cultural, intellectual, and social contexts. Diversity courses increase knowledge of what constitutes difference and increase students' ability to learn from and appreciate people, cultures, ideas, and art forms that are often different from those they know best. Students may complete the Cultural Diversity requirement at any time before graduation. www.ugst.umd.edu/core/elements/Diversity.html

IMPORTANT NOTES: Fundamental and Distributive Studies courses:

  • MUST be selected from the approved CORE course lists to count toward CORE requirements.  At www.ugst.umd.edu/core , click on “What are the CORE Courses?” for links to the current lists of approved courses in each CORE category.
  • MAY also be used to satisfy college, major, and/or supporting area requirements if the courses also appear on CORE Fundamental or Distributive Studies lists.
  • CORE courses MAY NOT be taken on a Pass-Fail basis.

I. CORE Fundamental Studies
Three Courses (9 credits) Required

1. One course in Academic Writing (Must be attempted within the first 30 credits; must be passed within the first 60 credits.) See:  www.english.umd.edu/academics/academicwriting

  • Approved CORE Academic Writing Courses:
       ENGL101 Academic Writing
       ENGL101A Academic Writing (Must be taken if student has TSWE [SAT verbal subtest] score below 33)
       ENGL101H Academic Writing (Honors Students)
       ENGL101X Academic Writing (Students for whom English is a second language may register for ENGL101X instead of ENGL101.)
  • Note: Based on scores from either the TOEFL or MEIP, students may be required to complete a program of English language instruction for non-native speakers through the MEI before being allowed to register for ENGL101X.

Exemptions from Academic Writing requirement (CORE Program Only):

  • AP English Language and Composition test score of 4 or 5, OR
  • SAT verbal score 670 or above for scores achieved between May 1995 and February 2005. (In April 1995, the Educational Testing Service re-centered the scores on the SAT.  Students whose test scores are from before April 1995 must have received a score of 600 or above to be exempt from Academic Writing.  This re-centering does not reflect a raising of the requirement for exemption, but a change in the scoring system used by ETS.
  • In March 2005, ETS began the use of a new SAT test for writing. Information about exemption in connection with SAT tests taken after March 2005 will be available at www.english.umd.edu/fw-program-general/fwp-exemptions/ .
  • Beginning in fall 2012, students under the new General Education program will not be exempted from the Academic Writing requirement based on SAT scores.

2. One course in Mathematics (Must be attempted within the first 30 credits; must be passed within the first 60 credits.) See www.ugst.umd.edu/core/courses/Fundamental/FundaSt-math.html

Approved CORE Fundamental Studies Mathematics Courses:
MATH110 Elementary Mathematical Models; OR
MATH112 College Algebra with Applications and Trigonometry; OR
MATH113 College Algebra with Applications; OR
MATH115 Pre-calculus; OR
Any 100- or 200-level MATH or STAT course except MATH199, 210, 211, 212,213, 214, and 274.

Exemptions from Mathematics requirement (CORE Program Only):

  • SAT Math score of 600 or above; OR
  • AP score of 4 or above in Calculus AB or BC; OR
  • AP score of 4 or above in Statistics; OR
  • CLEP Calculus Exam score of 50 or higher.
  • Beginning in fall 2012, students under the new General Education program will not be exempted from the Mathematics requirement based on SAT scores.

Note:  If you are placed in the Developmental Math Program by the Mathematics Placement Exam, you may be offered the opportunity to combine your Developmental course with the appropriate subsequent course of MATH110, 111, 113, or 115 and thus finish both in one semester. For further information, please see the Developmental Math Program web site: www.math.umd.edu/undergraduate/courses/fsm.html

3. One course in Professional Writing (taken after 60 credits).  www.ugst.umd.edu/core/courses/Fundamental/Funda-St-professional.html

Approved CORE Professional Writing Courses:

ENGL390 Science Writing
ENGL391 Advanced Composition
ENGL392 Legal Writing
ENGL393 Technical Writing
ENGL394 Business Writing
ENGL395 Writing for Health Professions
ENGL398 Topics in Professional Writing

Suffixed versions of the above course numbers also fulfill the CORE Professional Writing requirement.

Exemption from Professional Writing Requirement (CORE Program Only):

  • Grade of "A" in ENGL101 (NOT ENGL101A or ENGL101X), except for students majoring in Engineering.  All Engineering majors must take ENGL393.
  • Beginning in fall 2012, students under the new General Education program will not be exempted from the Professional Writing requirement based on a grade of "A" in ENGL101.

Note: No exemption from the Professional Writing requirement will be granted for achievement on SAT verbal exam.  Professional Writing courses cannot be used to fulfill Advanced Studies requirements.

II. CORE Distributive Studies
Nine Courses (28 credits) Required
See the listings of approved CORE courses in the online Schedule of Classes at https://ntst.umd.edu/soc/

1. Humanities and the Arts-three courses required

  • One course from Literature (HL), and
  • One course from The History or Theory of the Arts (HA), and
  • One more course from Literature (HL), OR The History or Theory of the Arts (HA), OR Humanities (HO).

Note: There is no specific CORE requirement for a Humanities (HO) course.

2. The Sciences and Mathematics - three courses required:

  • Up to two courses from Physical Sciences (PL/PS)
  • Up to two courses from Life Sciences (LL/LS)   
  • Up to one course from Mathematics and Formal Reasoning (MS)

Notes:  At least one science course MUST include or be accompanied by a lab taken in the same semester (LL or PL only).  More than one lab course may be taken.  Courses must be taken from at least two of the three categories.  There is no specific CORE requirement for a Mathematics and Formal Reasoning (MS) course.  At least two life and/or physical science courses must be taken (PL, PS, LL, and LS).  The third Sciences and Mathematics course may be another science selection or may be chosen from Mathematics and Formal Reasoning (MS) courses.

3. Social Sciences and History-three courses required:

  • One course from Social or Political History (SH) and
  • Two courses from Behavioral and Social Sciences (SB)

4. Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues (CORE CODE: IE)

OPTIONAL CORE DISTRIBUTIVE STUDIES CATEGORY EFFECTIVE BEGINNING FALL 2005

Details at: www.ugst.umd.edu/core/elements/DistrSt.html#IE

  • IE is an optional CORE distributive studies category; Students may fulfill CORE requirements without taking an IE course.
  • Only one IE course may be counted toward fulfilling CORE Distributive Studies requirements.
  • Whether a student takes an IE course or not, total CORE Distributive Studies course and credit requirements remain the same: at least 9 courses and 28 credits.

III. CORE Advanced Studies
Two Courses (6 credits) Required
Students may choose their two Advanced Studies courses from a wide range of upper-level offerings outside their majors.  Good choices include courses that mesh with or expand educational goals or other interests, increase knowledge, and strengthen critical thinking and writing skills.
CORE Advanced Studies Requirement: Two upper-level (300- or 400-level) courses outside the major taken after 60 credits.  Students may substitute a CORE approved senior capstone course in their major or a senior or honors thesis for one of the two required Advanced Studies courses.  Enrollment in CORE Capstone courses will be subject to departmental guidelines.  The other course must be outside the major. Students completing double majors or double degrees will have fulfilled the campus Advanced Studies requirement, unless their primary major or college has additional requirements.  The student's academic college determines whether or not a course is "outside the major" for the purpose of fulfilling CORE Advanced Studies.
The following may NOT be used to fulfill Advanced Studies requirements:

  • Professional Writing courses (courses that meet the Fundamental Studies upper-level writing requirement);
  • courses used to meet Distributive Studies requirements;
  • internships, practica, or other experiential learning types of courses;
  • courses taken on a pass/fail basis.

One independent studies course (minimum of three credits, outside the major) may be used toward Advanced Studies requirements as long as it is consistent with the rules above and the faculty member supervising the independent study agrees that it is appropriate for Advanced Studies.
Notes:  CORE Capstone courses must be taken within the major.  A senior thesis (minimum of 3 credits) or successful completion and defense of an honors thesis in either the Honors College or a Departmental Honors Program (minimum of 3 credits) counts as CORE Capstone credit.
See list of approved CORE Capstone courses at https://ntst.umd.edu/soc/

IV. CORE Human Cultural Diversity
One Course (3 credits) Required
See the CORE Diversity List in the online Schedule of Classes at https://ntst.umd.edu/soc/

Cultural Diversity courses focus primarily on:  (a) the history, status, treatment, or accomplishment of women or minority groups and subcultures; (b) non-Western culture, or (c) concepts and implications of diversity.
Note:  A number of CORE Human Cultural Diversity courses also satisfy CORE Distributive Studies, Advanced Studies, or a college, major, and/or supporting area requirement.

Study Abroad and Satisfying CORE Requirements see:
www.ugst.umd.edu/core/moreinfo/StudyAbroad.html

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