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Undergraduate Catalog 2014-2015


Approved Courses

The following list includes undergraduate courses that have been approved as of May 2014.  Courses added after that date do not appear in this list.  Courses eliminated after that date may still appear.  Not every course is offered regularly.  Students should consult the Schedule of Classes at www.testudo.umd.edu to ascertain which courses are actually offered during a given semester.

COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM

Number   Eligibility
000-099   Non-credit course
100-199   Primarily freshman course
200-299   Primarily sophomore course
300-399   Junior, senior course not acceptable for credit toward graduate degrees
386-387   Campus-wide internship courses; refer to information describing Experiential Learning
400-499   Junior, senior course acceptable for credit toward some graduate degree
500-599   Professional School course (Dentistry, Architecture, Law, Medicine) or post-baccalaureate course
600-899   Course restricted to graduate students
799   Master Thesis credit
899   Doctoral Dissertation credit

 

Use the search box below to view the approved courses.

Courses in "ENES-Engineering Science"

ENES - Engineering Science

ENES 100 Introduction to Engineering Design (3) Corequisite: MATH140. Students work as teams to design and build a product using computer software for word-processing, spreadsheet, CAD, and communication skills.

ENES 102 Mechanics I (3) Corequisite: MATH140. Restriction: Must be in a major in ENGR-A. James Clark School of Engineering. Formerly: ENES110. The equilibrium of stationary bodies under the influence of various kinds of forces. Forces, moments, couples, equilibrium, trusses, frames and machines, centroids, moment of inertia, beams, friction, stress/strain, material properties. Vector and scalar methods are used to solve problems.

ENES 104 Introduction to Materials and their Applications (3) Restriction: Must be in the Young Scholars Program. Creating a new technology, nanotechnology, biotechnology, or plastic electronics requires developing the materials first. In this class we'll explore materials science and engineering where engineers change the properties and/or behavior of a material to make them more useful. The course covers the chemical composition, phase transformations, corrosion and mechanical properties of materials as well as their electrical, thermal, magnetic and optical properties. Learn about the unlimited possibilities for innovation and adaption through the exciting field of nanotechnology.

ENES 106 Achieving Success in Mathematics (3) Restriction: Permission of ENGR-A. James Clark School of Engineering. An exploration of the skills and habits needed to successfully complete introductory mathematics courses.

ENES 107 Achieving College Excellence (1-3) Restriction: Permission of ENGR-A. James Clark School of Engineering. An exploration of the skills and habits needed to successfully complete the introductory chemistry course for engineering students. Course will also include strategies for a successful first year experience.

ENES 108 Achieving College Success: First Year Transition (1) Restriction: Permission of ENGR-A. James Clark School of Engineering. Repeatable to 2 credits if content differs. An exploration of the skills and habits needed to successfully complete the first year of study for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) majors. This course is an extension of the college success seminars taught during the Summer Bridge Program.

ENES 113 Virtus Living and Learning Community Seminar I (1) Restriction: Must be in first year Virtus program. The seminar focuses on personal and professional development related to the field of engineering with a strong emphasis on clarifying career goals and decisions. Additional topics include an introduction to basic tools, undergraduate research opportunities, and campus and engineering resources.

ENES 114 Virtus Seminar II (1) Prerequisite: ENES113. Restriction: Students must be participants in the Virtus Living and Learning Community. Focus on personal and professional development with engineering with a strong emphasis on career development. Learn to employ strategies and skills for academic and professional success.

ENES 115 FLEXUS Living and Learning Community Seminar I (1) Restriction: Must be a first year FLEXUS Participant. The seminar focuses on personal and professional development related to the field of engineering with a strong emphasis on clarifying career goals and decisions. Additional topics include an introduction to campus and engineering resources, basic tools, and undergraduate research opportunities. Students will discuss issues of concern through a variety of book readings, self-reflections, and panel discussions with practicing women engineers.

ENES 116 FLEXUS Living and Learning Community Seminar II (1) Prerequisite: ENES215, ENES115, and ENES116. Restriction: Must be a second year FLEXUS participant (coded as WCY). The seminar focuses on personal and professional development by enhancing technical ability, understanding educational options through minors and student projects in engineering, identifying and employing strategies and skills for academic and professional success, and developing career commitment through networking and mentoring. Students develop professional portfolios in preparation for a future internship or job.

ENES 140 Discovering New Ventures (3) Additional information: This course may count as an elective for a student at the University of Maryland, depending on the student's specific degree program. It cannot be counted towards the requirements for the Smith School of Business Entrepreneurship Fellow Program. Students explore dynamic company startup topics by working in teams to design a new venture. This multi-disciplinary course helps students to learn the basic business, strategy, and leadership skills needed to launch new ventures. Topics include learning how to assess the feasibility of a startup venture, as well as how to apply best practices for planning, launching, and managing new companies. Students discuss a wide range of issues of importance and concern to entrepreneurs and learn to recognize opportunities, assess the skills and talents of successful entrepreneurs, and learn models that help them navigate uncertainty.

ENES 141 Introduction to High-Tech Product Development and Marketing (3) Multi-disciplinary course covers basic concepts in technology marketing, business, engineering, and entrepreneurship in the context of developing and marketing innovative technology products and services. Mix of lectures, experiential learning, and hands-on team projects, culminating in student team presentations of high-tech product concepts and marketing plans.

ENES 142 Introduction to Innovative Thinking and Creativity (3) Methods for improving the flexibility and originality of thinking and exploring multiple approaches to creating and sustaining high levels of innovation. Topics include personal thinking preferences, eliminating mental blocks, creative thinking techniques, idea selection approaches, teaming techniques for creativity, design for interaction, and intellectual property.

ENES 143 Communication Essentials for Entrepreneurs (3) Credit only granted for: COMM107, COMM200, ENES143, INAG110, JOUR130, or THET285. Learn the processes and skills needed to give effective business presentations related to start-up ventures. Focus on how to research topics and companies; organize material based on speaking goals; analyze audience groups to meet speaking expectations; prepare informative and compelling presentation slides; deliver speeches professionally and effectively, and actively listen and provide speaker feedback to fellow students.

ENES 151 EES Fellows First Year Seminar I (1) Restriction: Restricted to EES Fellows students. This course is designed to prepare you to be successful in your first year in engineering, and throughout your educational career and work experiences. We will discuss Clark School education and research programs, the future of engineering, engineering as a profession, student communities and projects, and success skills.

ENES 152 Engineering Transfer Seminar I (1) Restriction: Restricted to EES Fellow students and new transfer students. An introduction to University life for new transfer engineering students. Students will explore how to successfully bridge the gap between the community college and the university. Students will explore campus resources and learn about internships, undergraduate research, study abroad and other academic opportunities. During the semester we will focus on areas that promote academic success and time management, effective study skills, career decision-making, and student development processes will also be explored.

ENES 154 EES Fellows Seminar II (1) Prerequisite: ENES151 or ENES152. The main objective of the course is to help students gain the skills and knowledge necessary for an effective transition into industry and/or graduate school.

ENES 181 Dialogue with the Dean (1) Restriction: Must be in a major in ENGR-A. James Clark School of Engineering; and must be a new freshman or transfer student. Introduction to Engineering as a Profession, Overview of Martin Institute and Clark School Education and Research Programs, The Future of Engineering and Engineering Education, Basic Technological Literacy, Business and Entrepreneurship Issues for Engineers, the Joy of Discovery, Student Projects: How to get involved, Research and Development Programs: How to get involved, What the corporate sector expects from a new engineering graduate.

ENES 182 Engineering the Future (1) An overview of the challenges facing society where the fields of engineering and science are being asked to provide the technologies underlying the proposed solutions including nanotechnology, sustainable energy, transportation, biotechnology, climate change, novel material and environmental impact. Also covered will be an understanding of how the different fields of engineering will play a role in solving these challenges.

ENES 190 Introduction to Design and Quality (4) Prerequisite: Permission of ENGR-A. James Clark School of Engineering. Also offered as: BMGT190. Credit only granted for: BMGT190 or ENES190. Expose engineering and business students to the principles of total quality, using experiential team learning and technology aided approaches. The first of four courses in total quality.

ENES 201 Introduction to Computer Aided Design (1) Fundamentals of CAD using a solid modeling package (e.g. Pro/E or AutoCAD). Two- and three-dimensional drawings. Dimensioning and specifications. Introduction of CAD-based analysis tools. Students will complete a design project.

ENES 210 Entrepreneurial Opportunity Analysis and Decision-Making in 21st Century Technology Ventures (3) This multi-disciplinary course helps students learn the principles of entrepreneurial opportunity analysis and decision-making in an increasingly dynamic and technically-inclined society. Emphasis is placed on how aspiring technology entrepreneurs can develop their entrepreneurial perspectives to develop winning entrepreneurial plans for their future ventures.

ENES 213 Virtus Living and Learning Community Seminar III (1) Prerequisite: ENES113. Restriction: Must be a participant in the second year of the Virtus program. The seminar focuses on personal, academic and professional success by cultivating leadership skills, developing academic and technical ability and encouraging self awareness, identifying and employing strategies for academic and professional success, further enhancing career development through networking and mentoring and developing awareness of diversity issues.

ENES 214 Virtus Seminar IV (1) Prerequisite: Students must have completed ENES213. Restriction: Students must be participants in the Virtus Living and Learning Community. Students continue to develop their leadership and mentoring skills, participate in networking opportunities and explore their interest in special engineering topics.

ENES 215 FLEXUS Living and Learning Community Seminar III (1) Prerequisite: ENES115 and ENES116. Restriction: Must be a second year FLEXUS participant. The seminar focuses on personal, academic and professional success by cultivating leadership skills, developing self-confidence and self-efficacy in academic and technical ability and encouraging self awareness, identifying and employing strategies for academic and professional success, further enhancing career development through networking, mentoring and role modeling, and developing awareness of diversity issues, specifically gender diversity.

ENES 216 FLEXUS Living and Learning Community Seminar IV (1) Prerequisite: ENES115, ENES116, and ENES215. Restriction: Restricted to second year FLEXUS participants. The seminar focuses on gender diversity and its cross-sections with culture. Students continue to enhance their leadership and mentoring skills, participate in networking opportunities with women in leadership roles and careers in engineering, and engage in opportunities for outreach and service-learning. Students will also complete a culminating semester project.

ENES 220 Mechanics II (3) Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in ENES102; and (MATH141 and PHYS161). Restriction: Must be in a major in ENGR-A. James Clark School of Engineering; and must not be in Engineering: Electrical program. Stress and deformation of solids-rods, beams, shafts, columns, tanks, and other structural, machine and vehicle members. Topics include stress transformation using Mohr's circle; shear and moment diagrams; derivation of elastic curves; and Euler's buckling formula. Design problems related to this material are given in lab.

ENES 221 Dynamics (3) Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in ENES102; and (MATH141 and PHYS161). Restriction: Must be in a major in ENGR-A. James Clark School of Engineering. Systems of heavy particles and rigid bodies at rest and in motion. Force-acceleration, work-energy and impulse-momentum relationships. Motion of one body relative to another in a plane and in space.

ENES 232 Thermodynamics (3) Prerequisite: PHYS261 and PHYS260. Restriction: Must be in a major in ENGR-A. James Clark School of Engineering. Credit only granted for: BIOE232, CHBE300, ENCH300, ENES232, ENMA461, ENME320, or ENME232. Formerly: ENME232 and ENME320. Introduction to thermodynamics. Thermodynamic properties of matter. First and second laws of thermodynamics, cycles, reactions, and mixtures.

ENES 259 Study Abroad Special Topics in Engineering II (1-6) Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. Special topics course in engineering science taken as part of an approved study abroad program.

ENES 269 Topics in Grand Challenges for Engineering in a Global Context (3) Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. Additional information: Course includes a study abroad component. No engineering background is required. Special topics course that explores the grand engineering challenges facing the world from a technical, cultural, political, and economic perspective, as well as solutions developed through innovation and technology. Topics can include energy, environment, urban infrastructure, health, safety and security, and engineering the tools of discovery.

ENES 270 Inventis-Professional Skills in Engineering (1) Prerequisite: ENES170. Restriction: Must be in the Inventis program. Engineering professional skills course focusing on team building, communication skills, technical writing, technology management, and intellectual property and standards.

ENES 288 Engineering Leadership Seminar (1-4) Corequisite: ENES100; or permission of instructor. Engineering leadership will be examined at the individual, team and organizational levels.

ENES 304 RISE Seminar (1) Restriction: Must be in the Engineering RISE Leadership Program; and permission of ENGR-A. James Clark School of Engineering. This course will focus on general leadership theories in addition to real-world applications of leadership in engineering education, industry, and government.

ENES 316 Global Leadership in Engineering, Business, & Technology (3) Restriction: Must be in a major in ENGR-A. James Clark School of Engineering; or permission of instructor. Additional information: Students will be required to participate in off-campus industry visits outside of the formal class meeting time. An introduction to global leadership research, theories, and practice with an emphasis on applied dimensions of global leadership in the engineering, business, and technology sectors. This course prepares students to further their knowledge and capacities for global leadership to be successful in industry.

ENES 317 Introduction to Engineering Leadership (3) Prerequisite: Permission of ENGR-A. James Clark School of Engineering. Focus is placed on general leadership theories in addition to real-world applications of leadership in engineering education, industry, and government.

ENES 388 Engineering Honors Seminar (1)

ENES 389 Selected Topics (3) Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs.

ENES 390 Systems Thinking for Managerial Decision Making (3) Prerequisite: ENES190 or BMGT190. Restriction: Must be in the QUEST program. Also offered as: BMGT390. Credit only granted for: BMGT390, BMGT498X, ENES390, or ENES498X. An introduction to the theory, concepts, tools, and practices of systems thinking to enhance managerial decision making. Offers a blend of theory, real-life examples, and proven methods to initiate and sustain an organization-wide reorientation towards systems thinking.

ENES 424 Engineering Leadership Capstone (3) Prerequisite: ENES472, ENCE320, and ENES317; and permission of ENGR-A. James Clark School of Engineering. Recommended: ENES100. The work initiated in the Introduction to Engineering Leadership course brings together further exploration of leadership styles and concepts.

ENES 435 Product Liability and Regulation (3) Key topics include, biotechnology, safety regulation, federal preemption, product liability, professional negligence, antitrust, privacy and information technology, risk modeling, environmental protection, patent, copyright, trade secrets, reverse engineering, scientific and technological evidence, international trade, engineering ethics. Examples include plane crashes, computer chip protection, human machine interfaces, nuclear power plants, internet censorship, flood control, earthquakes and biomedical technology.

ENES 440 Science, Technology and Society: Certificate Program Capstone (3) Restriction: Must be in the Science, Technology and Society certificate program; or permission of ENGR-A. James Clark School of Engineering. Credit only granted for: ENES440 or UNIV401. Formerly: UNIV401. Capstone research seminar for students in the Science, Technology and Society certificate program.

ENES 458 Topics in International Engineering (1-4) Prerequisite: ENES100. Repeatable to 12 credits if content differs. A variety of topics related to engineering in a global context are discussed including cultural aspects, cross-cultural communication, international standards and law, and engineering and technology issues, business behavior, attitudes and values of selected countries and regions.

ENES 459 Study Abroad Special Topics in Engineering IV (1-6) Repeatable to 15 credits if content differs. Special topics course in engineering science taken as part of an approved study abroad program.

ENES 460 Fundamentals of Technology Start-Up Ventures (3) Formerly: ENES489A. Fundamental aspects of creating, organizing, funding, managing, and growing a technology startup venture. This multidisciplinary course will draw on management, business, legal, financial, as well as technical, concepts. Students form teams and develop a business plan for a technology company, based on each team's own business idea and then present the plan to a panel of outside experts.

ENES 461 Advanced Entrepreneurial Opportunity Analysis in Technology Ventures (3) Explores the factors that influence entrepreneurial opportunity analysis in technology-based ventures. Uses a cognitive theoretical framework to examine the integration of motivation, emotions and information processing modes to make complex entrepreneurial decisions in fast pace technology venture environments.

ENES 462 Marketing High-Technology Products and Innovations (3) Examines the opportunities and challenges of marketing high-technology products in turbulent environments requiring rapid decision making with incomplete information. Explores how innovations are introduced at frequent intervals, research-and-development spending is vital, and there are high mortality rates for both products and businesses.

ENES 463 Strategies for Managing Innovation (3) Emphasizes how the technology entrepreneur can use strategic management of innovation and technology to enhance firm performance. Examines the process of technological change, the ways that firms come up with innovations, the strategies that firms use to benefit from innovation, and the process of formulating technology strategy. Provides frameworks for analyzing key aspects of these industries and teaches students how to apply these frameworks.

ENES 464 International Entrepreneurship and Innovation (3) Focuses on the need for every entrepreneur and innovator to understand the global market in today's hypercompetitive world, and to appreciate how to compete effectively in domestic markets by managing international competitors, suppliers, and influences. Explore how the distinction between foreign and domestic markets is becoming less pronounced. Develop skills to identify and manage opportunities on a global basis.

ENES 465 Entrepreneurial Design Thinking (3) Explores the use of design thinking as an approach to developing customer-centered solutions to problems and fostering sustained innovation within an orgranization. Through interactive lectures, discussions, and hands-on, team-based activities, students will learn design thinking strategies and apply them to finding innovative product- or service-based solutions to contemporary issues.

ENES 472 International Business Cultures in Engineering and Technology (3) Prerequisite: Permission of ENGR-A. James Clark School of Engineering. Restriction: Sophomore standing or higher. Also offered as: SLLC472. Credit only granted for: ARHU439B, ARHU439E, ARHU439T, ENES472, SLLC471, SLLC472, or SLLC473. Formerly: ARHU439T. The goal is to provide students with an understanding of cultural aspects pertaining to global business and engineering and develop the cultural understanding, attitudes, and communication skills needed to function appropriately within an increasingly global and multicultural working environment.

ENES 474 Global Perspectives of Engineering (3) Prerequisite: ENES100; or permission of ENGR-A. James Clark School of Engineering. Restriction: Must be in the International Engineering Minor. Credit only granted for: ENES458M or ENES474. Formerly: ENES458M. Faculty supervised research on aspects of engineering in a foreign country including leading fields of research, key world markets, and the culture of the engineering workplace. Students will produce a comprehensive report exhibiting their expertise in their chosen country and the field of engineering within.

ENES 478 Topics in Engineering Education (1) Restriction: Must be in the Engineering Teaching Fellow program. Repeatable to 3 credits if content differs. Topics related to teaching engineering courses, particularly project-based courses. Topics can include learning styles, student development theory, multicultural issues in teaching, facilitating team experiences, assessment, and academic integrity.

ENES 480 Engineering Honors Seminar I (1) Restriction: Must be in College of Engineering Honors; and junior standing or higher. Introduction to engineering leadership, professionalism, and ethics. Discussions of leadership style, elements of success, professional communication, codes of ethics, handling of ethical dilemmas, and the characteristics of a professional.

ENES 481 Engineering Honors Seminar II (1) Restriction: Must be in College of Engineering Honors; and junior standing or higher. Introduction to engineering creativity and innovation in engineering. Application of methods of creativity to topics in communication, conducting research, and leadership.

ENES 489 Special Topics in Engineering (3-6) Prerequisite: Permission of ENGR-A. James Clark School of Engineering. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. Special topics in engineering.

ENES 490 Quest Consulting and Innovation Practicum (4) Prerequisite: ENES390 or BMGT390. Also offered as: BMGT490. Credit only granted for: BMGT490 or ENES490. Final course in the QUEST Honors Fellows Program three-course curriculum. Based on a team-based consulting project with one of QUEST's professional partners. A project advisor and professional champion supervise each student team. Requires extensive out-of-class work.

ENES 496 NASA Academy (4) Prerequisite: Permission of ENGR-A. James Clark School of Engineering. Restriction: Junior standing or higher. Also offered as: CMPS496, GEOG496. Credit only granted for: CMPS496, ENES496, or GEOG496. A ten-week resident summer institute at Goddard Space Flight Center for juniors, seniors and first-year graduate students interested in pursuing professional and leadership careers in aerospace-related fields. The national program includes research in a Goddard laboratory, field trips to NASA centers, and a combination of lectures and workshops on the mission, current activities and management of NASA. Students interested in the Academy will find information at http://nasa-academy.nasa.gov Application should be made by the end of January; sponsorship by an affiliated State Space Grant Consortium is customary, but not required.

ENES 498 Special Topics in Entrepreneurship (3) Restriction: Must be in Hinman CEOs Program. Repeatable to 12 credits if content differs. This entrepreneurship seminar and case study-based course will explore technology entrepreneurship with a focus on leadership, marketing, team-building, and management of new technology ventures and assumes baseline knowledge of entrepreneurship. Students will learn skills needed to succeed as a technology entrepreneur and how to apply best practices for planning, launching, and growing new companies. This course is a requirement of the Hinman CEOs program.

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