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Undergraduate Catalog 2013-2014


Approved Courses

The following list includes undergraduate courses that have been approved as of  June 2010.  Courses added after that date do not appear in this list.  Courses eliminated after that date may still appear.  Not every course is offered regularly.  Students should consult the Schedule of Classes at www.testudo.umd.edu  to ascertain which courses are actually offered during a given semester.

COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM

Number   Eligibility
000-099   Non-credit course
100-199   Primarily freshman course
200-299   Primarily sophomore course
300-399   Junior, senior course not acceptable for credit toward graduate degrees
386-387   Campus-wide internship courses; refer to information describing Experiential Learning
400-499   Junior, senior course acceptable for credit toward some graduate degree
500-599   Professional School course (Dentistry, Architecture, Law, Medicine) or post-baccalaureate course
600-899   Course restricted to graduate students
799   Master Thesis credit
899   Doctoral Dissertation credit

Use the search box below to view the approved courses.

Courses in "GEOG-Geographical Sciences"

GEOG - Geographical Sciences

GEOG 100 Introduction to Geography (3) An introduction to the broad field of geography as it is applicable to the general education student. The course presents the basic rationale of variations in human occupancy of the earth and stresses geographic concepts relevant to understanding world, regional and local issues.

GEOG 110 The World Today: Global Perspectives (3) The most critical issue facing the world today is the sustainability of both human and physical systems in the 21st century. This class uses the context of regions of the world to explore the 21st century issues of climate change, development, politics, economy, and demography. Each region will be used to highlight aspects of sustainability.

GEOG 123 Causes and Implications of Global Change (3) Also offered as: AOSC123, GEOL123. Credit only granted for: AOSC123, GEOG123, GEOL123, or METO123. A unique experience in integrating physical, chemical, geological, and biological sciences with geographical, economic, sociological, and political knowledge skills toward a better understanding of global change. Review of environmental science relating to weather and climate change, acid precipitation, ozone holes, global warming, and impacts on biology, agriculture, and human behavior. Study of the natural, long- term variability of the global environment, and what influence mankind may have in perturbing it from its natural evolution. Concepts of how physical, biological, and human behavioral systems interact, and the repercussions which may follow human endeavors. The manner in which to approach decision and policy making related to global change.

GEOG 130 Developing Countries (3) An introduction to the geographic characteristics of the development problems and prospects of developing countries. Spatial distribution of poverty, employment, migration and urban growth, agricultural productivity, rural development, policies and international trade. Portraits of selected developing countries.

GEOG 140 Natural Disasters: Earthquakes, Floods, and Fires (3) Catastrophic Environmental Events (CCE) that are becoming more common in this time of global environmental change and it is essential that today's students be equipped with the knowledge and skills to be leaders as we, as a society, understand the upheaval that these CCEs are causing. Students will examine how CEEs shape human society and ecosystem from the interdisciplinary perspective afforded by the field of Geography. Students will use the latest geographic science concepts and techniques in exploring these events. Using satellite imagery they will gain a multi-scale perspective of the ecological and societal aspects of the events.

GEOG 158 Special Topics in Study Abroad I (1-6) Repeatable to 15 credits if content differs. Special topics course taken as part of an approved study abroad program.

GEOG 170 Introduction to Methods of Geospatial Intelligence and Analysis (3) Introduction to technical methods used in gathering, analyzing, and presenting geospatial information, addressing the needs of geospatial analysis, such as environmental monitoring, situational awareness, disaster management, and human systems. Topics include basics of locational reference systems, map projections, satellite and airborne remote sensing, global positioning systems, geographic information systems, cartography, and introductory statistics and probability. The course is a gateway to more advanced technical classes in geoinformatics.

GEOG 201 Geography of Environmental Systems (3) A systematic introduction to the processes and associated forms of the atmosphere and earth's surfaces emphasizing the interaction between climatology, hydrology and geomorphology.

GEOG 202 Introduction to Human Geography (3) Introduction to what geographers do and how they do it. Systematic study of issues regarding social and cultural systems from a global to a local scale. Looks at the distribution of these variables and answers the question "Why here, and not there"?

GEOG 211 Geography of Environmental Systems Laboratory (1) Prerequisite: Must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in GEOL120, GEOL100, or GEOG201. A laboratory course to accompany GEOG 201. Analysis of the components of the earth's energy balance using basic instrumentation; weather map interpretation; soil analysis; the application of map and air photo interpretation techniques to landform analysis.

GEOG 212 Introduction to Human Geography Laboratory (1) Prerequisite: Must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in GEOG202. Restriction: Must be in Geography program. Introduction to the basic methods and techniques employed in human geography.

GEOG 258 Special Topics in Study Abroad II (1-6) Repeatable to 15 credits if content differs. Special topics course taken as part of an approved study abroad program.

GEOG 306 Introduction to Quantitative Methods for the Geographic Environmental Sciences (3) Credit only granted for: BIOM301, BMGT230, CCJS200, ECON321, EDMS451, GEOG306, GVPT422, PSYC200, or SOCY201. Essentials in the quantitative analysis of spatial and other data, with a particular emphasis on statistics and programming. Topics include data display, data description and summary, statistical inference and significance tests, analysis of variance, correlation, regression, and some advanced concepts, such as matrix methods, principal component analysis, and spatial statistics. Students will develop expertise in data analysis using advanced statistical software.

GEOG 310 Maryland and Adjacent Areas (3) Credit only granted for: GEOG310 or GEOG321. Formerly: GEOG321. The physical environment, natural resources, and population in relation to agriculture, industry, transport, and trade in the State of Maryland and adjacent areas.

GEOG 312 The United States and Canada (3) Credit only granted for: GEOG312 or GEOG320. Formerly: GEOG320. The two countries as functioning geographic systems with important differences and key linkages. An examination of the cultural, environmental, and economic components and their spatial variation. Attention to the role of regions in national economies.

GEOG 313 Latin America (3) Credit only granted for: GEOG313 or GEOG323. Formerly: GEOG323. A geography of Latin America and the Caribbean in the contemporary world: political and cultural regions, population and resource distribution, historical development, current levels of economic and social well-being, urbanization, development policies, migration trends, physical features and climates.

GEOG 328 Topics in Regional Geography (3) Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. Selected topics in regional geography.

GEOG 330 As the World Turns: Society and Sustainability in a Time of Great Change (3) Credit only granted for: GEOG330, GEOG360, or GEOG362. Formerly: GEOG362. Cultural geography course on society and sustainability. Culture is the basic building block that is key to sustainability of societies. Course will cover sustainability of societies on different scales, examining local, regional, and worldwide issues. Sustainability will be examined as a key element of environmental sustainability. How societies adjust to rapid world change will be examined as a positive and/or negative factor in sustainability.

GEOG 331 Introduction to Human Dimensions of Global Change (3) Prerequisite: ANTH220, ANTH260, GEOG202, or GEOG201; or permission of BSOS-Geography department. Credit only granted for: GEOG331 or GEOG361. Formerly: GEOG361. Introduction to global-scale interrelationship between human beings and the environment. The development of global issues including but not limited to the environment, food, energy, technology, population, and policy.

GEOG 332 Economic Geography (3) Credit only granted for: GEOG203, GEOG303, or GEOG332. Formerly: GEOG303. Principles of managing scarce resources in a world where everyone faces tradeoffs across both time and space. Focuses on the relationship between globalization processes and changing patterns of locational advantages, production, trade, population, socioeconomic and environmental grace and sustainability.

GEOG 334 The American City: Past and Present (3) Credit only granted for: GEOG334 or GEOG350. Formerly: GEOG350. Development of the American city from the early 19th century to the present. The internal structure of contemporary metropolitan areas, the spatial arrangement of residential, commercial, and other activities. Washington, D.C. and Baltimore examples.

GEOG 340 Geomorphology (3) Survey of landform types and role of processes in their generation. Frequency of occurrence and implications for land utilization. Emphasis on coastal, fluvial, and glacial landforms in different environmental settings. Landform regions of Maryland.

GEOG 342 Introduction to Biogeography (3) Prerequisite: GEOG201. Recommended: GEOG211. Credit only granted for: GEOG342 or GEOG347. Formerly: GEOG347. The principles of biogeography, including the patterns, processes and distributions of living organisms from local to global scales, aspects of ecophysiology, population and community ecology and evolutionary biology. Spatial processes in the biosphere will be covered.

GEOG 345 Introduction to Climatology (3) The geographic aspects of climate with emphasis on energy-moisture budgets, steady-state and non steady-state climatology, and climatic variations at both macro-and micro-scales.

GEOG 346 Cycles in the Earth System (3) Prerequisite: GEOG123, AOSC123, GEOL123, or MATH140; or permission of BSOS-Geography department. Recommended: PHYS171, PHYS141, PHYS161, or MATH141. Also offered as: AOSC346, GEOL346. Credit only granted for: AOSC346, GEOG346, or GEOL346. The Earth System operates through some fundamental cycles such as water, energy, and the Carbon Cycle. This course will build on GEOL/GEOG/AOSC123 starting with concept of feedbacks within the Earth System, global energy balance and the Greenhouse Effect. A brief introduction to the atmospheric and oceanic circulation will lead to the water cycle connecting the land, ocean, and atmosphere to the Earth System. Introduction to the Global carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur cycles will be followed by the concept of long-term climate regulation and short-term climate variability. The concepts of cycles, feedbacks, forcings, and responses in the Earth System will be applied to Global Warming and Ozone Depletion.

GEOG 358 Special Topics in Study Abroad III (1-6) Repeatable to 15 credits if content differs. Special topics course taken as part of an approved study abroad program.

GEOG 372 Remote Sensing (3) Principles of remote sensing in relation to photographic, thermal infrared and radar imaging. Methods of obtaining quantitative information from remotely-sensed images. Interpretation of remotely-sensed images emphasizing the study of spatial and environmental relationships.

GEOG 373 Geographic Information Systems (3) Characteristics and organization of geographic data; creation and use of digital geospatial databases; metadata; spatial data models for thematic mapping and map analysis; use of geographic information system in society, government, and business. Practical training with use of advanced software and geographic databases.

GEOG 375 Introduction to Computer Cartography (3) Credit only granted for: GEOG370, GEOG371, or GEOG375. Formerly: GEOG371. Principles of cartographic database, earth-map relations, map design, symbolization and color usage. Practical skills of making different thematic maps using simple software packages.

GEOG 376 Introduction to Computer Programming for GIS (3) Prerequisite: Must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in MATH220, MATH130, or MATH140. And GEOG373; or permission of BSOS-Geography department. Introduces conceptual and practical aspects of programming for geographic applications. The main focus is on developing a solid understanding of basic programming techniques irrespective of the specific programming language including variables, looping, conditional statements, nesting, math, strings, and other concepts. In addition, students will develop a proficiency in applying these basic programming principles to manipulating spatial data sources within the Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

GEOG 384 Internship in Geography I (3) Prerequisite: GEOG211, GEOG306, GEOG212, and GEOG201; and (ENGL393 or ENGL390). Restriction: Must be in Geography program. Supervised field training to provide career experience. Introduction to professional level activities, demands, opportunities. Placement at a public agency, non-profit organization, or private firm. Participation requires application to the internship advisor in preceding semester.

GEOG 385 Internship in Geography II (3) Prerequisite: GEOG211, GEOG306, GEOG212, and GEOG201; and must have completed a Junior (Professional) English course. Restriction: Must be in Geography program. Supervised field training to provide career experience. Introduction to professional-level activities, demands, opportunities. Placement at a public agency, nonprofit organization, or private firm. Participation requires application to the internship advisor in preceding semester.

GEOG 396 Honors Research (3) Restriction: Permission of BSOS-Geography department; and senior standing or higher; and must be in Geography program. Formerly: GEOG397. First course in the departmental honors sequence. Student development of a potential research topic under the guidance of a faculty advisor, culminating in a written and oral presentation of a research proposal.

GEOG 397 Honors Thesis (3) Prerequisite: GEOG396. Restriction: Must be in Geography program; and senior standing or higher. Formerly: GEOG399. Second course in the departmental honors sequence. Student research under the auspices of a faculty advisor, culminating in a research paper to be defended orally before the geography honors committee.

GEOG 398 Special Topics in Geography (1-3) Restriction: Permission of BSOS-Geography department. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. Credit only granted for: GEOG298 or GEOG398. Formerly: GEOG298. An introductory course dealing with special topics in geography.

GEOG 410 Washington, D.C.: Past and Present (3) Credit only granted for: GEOG410 or GEOG454. Formerly: GEOG454. This course is designed as a field study of Washington, D.C. from its origin as the Federal Capital to its role in the development of the metropolitan area. Through lectures and extensive field trips, the course will focus on the symbiosis and interrelation of Washington, D.C. and its region: historical, socio-economic, spatial and environmental.

GEOG 413 Migration: Latin America and the United States (3) Prerequisite: GEOG313; or permission of BSOS-Geography department. Recommended: HIST250; or USLT201; or LASC234. Credit only granted for: GEOG413, or GEOG498M. Formerly: GEOG498M. Develops an understanding of the push and pull factors that have contributed to human mobility (migration) that has transformed the Americas. The class is divided in two parts: immigration and emigration from Latin American and Latin America migration to the United States. We will be interested in studying the migration shifts that have occurred in Latin America and the theories that help explain them. The themes that will be addressed are the history of migration with Latin America and to North America, the impact of this migration on both sending and receiving countries, and the various policy strategies and issues concerning migration.

GEOG 415 Land Use, Climate Change, and Sustainability (3) Prerequisite: GEOG123 or GEOG306; or permission of BSOS-Geography department. Recommended: GEOG340; or GEOG342; or GEOG331. Or GEOG201; and GEOG211. Credit only granted for: GEOG415 or GEOG498D. Formerly: GEOG498D. The issues of climate change and land use change as two interlinked global and regional environmental issues and their implications for society and resource use are explored.

GEOG 416 Conceptualizing and Modeling Human-Environmental Interactions (3) Prerequisite: GEOG306, STAT100, or MATH111; or permission of BSOS-Geography department. Corequisite: MATH130, MATH140, or MATH220. Credit only granted for: GEOG416 or GEOG498N. Formerly: GEOG498N. Develops skills to carry out research that integrates environmental and economic aspects of sustainability by introducing extensively used quantitative tools for analyzing human-environmental interactions in the field of ecological economics. These include, e.g., index number calculations and decomposition analysis, Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC), environmental input-output analysis and life-cycle analysis, and multi-criteria decisions aid (MCDA). Students will need laptops to run models during class.

GEOG 418 Field and Laboratory Techniques in Environmental Science (1-3) Restriction: Permission of BSOS-Geography department. Credit only granted for: GEOG418 or GEOG448. Formerly: GEOG448. Lecture and laboratory learning each week. A variable credit course that introduces field and laboratory analyses in environmental science. Individual learning contract are developed with instructor.

GEOG 431 Culture and Natural Resource Management (3) Credit only granted for: GEOG421 or GEOG431. Formerly: GEOG421. Basic issues concerning the natural history of humans from the perspective of the geographer. Basic components of selected behavioral and natural systems, their evolution and adaptation, and survival strategies.

GEOG 432 Location Theory and Spatial Analysis (3) Credit only granted for: GEOG430 or GEOG432. Formerly: GEOG430. Theories and procedures for determining the optimal location of industrial, commercial and public facilities. Techniques to evaluate location decisions. The provision of services with regions and metropolitan areas. Emerging trends.

GEOG 434 The Contemporary City (3) Credit only granted for: GEOG434 or GEOG450. Formerly: GEOG450. The contemporary urban system: towns, cities and metropolitan areas and their role as concentrations of social and economic activity. Patterns of land-use: residential, employment, commercial activity, manufacturing, and transportation. Explanatory and descriptive models. International comparisons.

GEOG 435 Population Geography (3) Credit only granted for: GEOG422 or GEOG435. Formerly: GEOG422. The spatial characteristics of population distribution and growth, migration, fertility and mortality from a global perspective. Basic population-environmental relationships; carrying capacity, density, relationships to national development.

GEOG 437 Political Geography (3) Credit only granted for: GEOG423 or GEOG437. Formerly: GEOG423. Geographical factors in the national power and international relations; an analysis of the role of geopolitics and geostrategy, with special reference to the current world scene.

GEOG 438 Seminar in Human Geography (3) Recommended: GEOG201; or GEOG211. Restriction: Permission of BSOS-Geography department. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. Selected topics in human geography.

GEOG 441 The Coastal Ocean (3) Prerequisite: GEOG140; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department; or permission of BSOS-Geography department. Credit only granted for: GEOG441 or GEOG498C. Formerly: GEOG498C. Introduction to coastal oceanography, focusing on the physical, biological, and geological aspects of ocean areqs on the inner continental shelves. Wave, currents, and tidal dynamics of bays, open coast, estuaries, and deltas. Sedimentary environments of major coastal types. Ecology and biogeochemical relationships, including benthic and planktonic characteristics. Coastal evolution with sea level rise. Human impacts: eutrophication, modification of sedimentation. The coastal future: rising sea level, hypoxia, and increased storminess.

GEOG 442 Biogeography and Environmental Change (3) Prerequisite: GEOG342; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department. Recommended: GEOG123. Credit only granted for: GEOG442, GEOG447, or GEOG484. Formerly: GEOG447. Biogeographical topics of global significance, including a consideration of measurement techniques, and both descriptive and mechanistic modeling. Topics may include: scale in biogeography, climate and vegetation, global carbon cycle, biodiversity, interannual variability in the biosphere, land cover, global biospheric responses to climate change, NASA's Mission to Planet Earth and Earth Observation System.

GEOG 445 Climatology (3) Prerequisite: GEOG345. Credit only granted for: GEOG445 or GEOG446. Formerly: GEOG446. Quantitative investigations into the Earth's radiation balance, water cycle, and the interrelationship of climate and vegetation. Methodologies in climate research. Case studies related to global climatic change.

GEOG 456 The Social Geography of Metropolitan Areas in Global Perspective (3) A socio-spatial approach to human interaction within the urban environments: ways people perceive, define, behave in, and structure world cities and metropolitan areas. Cultural and social differences define spatial patterns of social activities which further define distinctions in distribution and interaction of people and their social institutions.

GEOG 458 Special Topics in Study Abroad IV (1-6) Repeatable to 15 credits if content differs. Special topics course taken as part of an approved study abroad program.

GEOG 472 Remote Sensing: Digital Processing and Analysis (3) Prerequisite: GEOG372 or GEOG306; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department. Credit only granted for: GEOG472 or GEOG480. Formerly: GEOG480. Digital image processing and analysis applied to satellite and aircraft land remote sensing data. Consideration is given to preprocessing steps including calibration and geo registration. Analysis methods include digital image exploration, feature extraction thematic classification, change detection, and biophysical characterization. One or more application examples may be reviewed.

GEOG 473 Geographic Information Systems and Spatial Analysis (3) Prerequisite: GEOG373 or GEOG306; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department. Credit only granted for: GEOG473 or GEOG482. Formerly: GEOG482. Analytical uses of geographic information systems; data models for building geographic data bases; types of geographic data and spatial problems; practical experience using advanced software for thematic domains such as terrain analysis, land suitability modeling, demographic analysis, and transportation studies.

GEOG 475 Computer Cartography (3) Prerequisite: GEOG373 or GEOG306. Credit only granted for: GEOG471 or GEOG475. Formerly: GEOG471. Advanced skills of computer mapping using more sophisticated software packages. Map projection evaluation and selection, coordinate system conversion, techniques of quantitative thematic mapping, map design and generalization, hypermedia and animated cartography. Emphasis on designing and making cartographically sound sophisticated thematic maps.

GEOG 476 Object-Oriented Computer Programming for GIS (3) Prerequisite: GEOG373 and GEOG376; or permission of BSOS-Geography department. And must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in MATH220, MATH130, or MATH140. Restriction: Must be in Geography program; or must be in GIS minor. Credit only granted for: GEOG498G or GEOG476. Formerly: GEOG498G. Expands on conceptual and practical aspects of programming for geographic applications. The main focus of this course is to provide students more advanced programming in object oriented programming languages (i.e. Python). In addition, students will develop a proficiency in applying these advanced programming principles to manipulating spatial data sources within the Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

GEOG 496 NASA Academy (4) Restriction: Permission of BSOS-College of Behavioral & Social Sciences; and junior standing or higher. Also offered as: CMPS496, ENES496. Credit only granted for: CMPS496, GEOG496, or ENES496. A ten-week resident summer institute at Goddard Space Flight Center for juniors, seniors and first-year graduate students interested in pursuing professional and leadership careers in aerospace-related fields. The national program includes research in a Goddard laboratory, field trips to NASA centers, and a combination of lectures and workshops on the mission, current activities and management of NASA. Students interested in the Academy will find information at http://nasa-academy.nasa.gov Application should be made by the end of January; sponsorship by an affiliated State Space Grant Consortium is customary, but not required.

GEOG 498 Topical Investigations (1-3) Prerequisite: Restricted to advanced undergraduate students; and 24 credits in GEOG courses. Or restricted to graduate students. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. Independent study under individual guidance.

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